Acoustic Engineer

Acoustic Engineer

Acoustic engineering is the branch of engineering that deals with sound and vibration.

Unwanted noise can have a number of significant impacts, such as reducing people's health and wellbeing, causing hearing loss, and making it harder to learn (in a noisy classroom, for example). So acoustic engineers can really make people's lives better.

Acoustic engineers also design more positive uses of sound. In building acoustics, for example, they make sure that the design of concert halls and lecture theatres will allow audiences to hear music and speakers properly. They may also be involved in the design of public address systems.

In New Zealand, most acoustic engineers are employed by specialist acoustic engineering companies. They may also work in noise control and environmental health areas.

Are acoustic engineers the same as sound engineers? 

No – sound engineers work at concerts and stage shows to make sure the music and voices are projected evenly to everybody in the audience. And sound technicians record voices and music for radio, television and films.

How much do acoustic engineers earn?

  • $45-55,000 starting salary

Key tertiary qualifications for acoustic engineers include:

Other acoustic engineers come from a range of different backgrounds, such as other areas of engineering, science or planning.

Required and recommended school subjects:

  • Calculus (required for engineering pathways)
  • Physics (required for engineering pathways)
  • Statistics & Modelling
  • English
  • Technology subjects

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Acoustic Engineer: People who work in this role

  • Andre Cowan

    Acoustic Engineer, Andre Cowan at work

    Robbie Blakelock

    Acoustic Consultant, Robbie Blakelock at work

    Aaron Staples

    Acoustic Engineer, Aaron Staples at work

Acoustic Engineer: Companies that employ people in this job role

  • Marshall Day Acoustics
    Marshall Day Acoustics
    Stantec
    Stantec

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